Dutch economy will shrink by 6% this year

Beyond the public healthcare crisis the coronavirus poses, economic recession is also looming on the horizon.

The Central Bureau of Planning (CPB) estimates that the Dutch economy will shrink by 6% this year. A limited recovery with a growth of 3% may occur in 2021, while unemployment is is rising and will double by 2021, reports NOS.

Uncertainty over the pandemic

The CPB expressed concern over the possibility of a second wave of coronavirus. If tight restrictions are taken again, the economy will deteriorate even further. If that is the case, the economy will shrink also in 2021, unemployment may reach 10% and government debt will rise to over 75% of the GDP.

Another factor to consider is also if other countries that trade with the Netherlands don’t recover, that will also have a negative impact on the Dutch economy. On the other hand, the economy could recover if restrictions get eased, leading to consumer optimism.

According to an economic plan laid down by the CPB back in March, the Netherlands is approaching “the darkest scenario”, in which the CPB took into account a shrinkage of 7.7%.

One of the options is a V recession. What that means it is that the economy will contract significantly, followed by a period of fast recovery. In those circumstances, the government needs to spend more money helping companies stay afloat, while tax revenue will fall and unemployment benefits will increase. The CPB considers the consequences of this scenario as “large, but tolerable” for the government budget.

A positive scenario

The CPB has also considered that there’s a chance for economic growth to increase if people spend the money they saved this year on things like vacations or restaurant visits in 2021. Companies could also make additional investments and so the unemployment rise would be limited, as people could then find jobs easier in other industries.

How are you approaching this year economically? Let us know in the comments!

Feature Image: DutchReview

Vlad Moca-Grama
Vlad Moca-Grama
Vlad was born and raised in Brasov, Romania and came to the Hague to study. When he isn't spending time missing mountains or complaining about the lack of urban exploration locations in the Netherlands, you can find him writing at Dutch Review.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Related posts

Latest posts

Big Brother: Dutch municipalities secretly watch citizens through social media

Last month Dutch Facebook users found out that their personal details had been leaked, now there is more bad news. It turns out Dutch...

Here are the relaxations we’ll see in the Netherlands from Wednesday

As predicted, outgoing Minister of Health, Hugo de Jonge, has announced that there will be further relaxations on Dutch coronavirus measures from Wednesday. Rutte...

How are the Dutch responding to recent events in Gaza? Protests and official statements

While thousands of people in the Netherlands attended pro-Palestine protests on Sunday, the country's prime minister has given a somewhat confusing response. Rutte has...
X