Man passes away in Dutch hospital — but no one can identify him or his family

A Dutch hospital has been left with the task of finding out the identity of one of their patients who passed away. The man is believed to have been East Asian, however, this is about as much as the staff know about his identity.

Gelre Hospital in Zutphen received the man in a serious condition on August 10. He died of natural causes a few days later. However, the hospital have been unable to identify him and, as a result, any of his potential family members. Police have now launched an appeal.

One hospital staff tells De Stentor — a Zwolle-based regional newspaper — that in his 19 years of working there, he has never seen anything like this. “This is very sad, and we hope that relatives are found soon.”

No crime involved

The man was brought into the hospital by people driving a blue Ford Focus. However, they left the hospital without leaving any identification or contact details behind.

While the manner in which he was left is a bit mysterious, police and hospital staff have ruled out that his death was the result of a crime.

The reason for police involvement is simple: when an unidentified person passes away in Dutch hospitals, the police step in to make an appeal for more information.

The appeal

Police have released a description of the man’s identity as well as an image of the jacket he was wearing when he was brought into the hospital (as seen in our feature image).

The man is presumed to have been East Asian, with brown eyes, a normal build (weighing 74 kilograms), and dark brown hair. He was 1.68 metres (5ft 5 inches) tall and had a scar on his head that could be found on the right side under his hair.

Anyone who may have any information about the man can call the police at 0900-8844 or completely anonymously via 0800-7000.

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Feature Image: Politie.nl/Press Release

Sarah O'Leary 🇮🇪
Sarah originally arrived in the Netherlands due to an inability to make her own decisions — she was simply told by her mother to choose the Netherlands for Erasmus. Life here has been challenging (have you heard the language) but brilliant for Sarah, and she loves to write about it. When Sarah is not acting as a safety threat to herself and others (cycling), you can find her sitting in a corner of Leiden with a coffee, trying to sound witty.

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