Too Many Travellers on Dutch Trains and it Might Only Get Busier

Even though all of us complain about how much trouble we have with the Dutch railways, there’s no way we could avoid taking them because we have places to be and things to do. This is reflected in the growth of the number of travellers using them, which is faster than ProRail expected.

The latest figures show us that the number of passengers has grown by 4.6%. With growth rate increasing fast, the officials are saying that it will not be possible to extend the timetables and trains from 2027, reports NOS.

According to Roger van Boxtel, the NS chief executive, the Dutch need more trains, and they need them quick! “Now that the rail ceiling is approaching early, we urgently need more capacity to be able to run more trains,” he explained. “NS is, therefore, arguing, together with other transport companies, that the budget for ProRail should be made available sooner to resolve bottlenecks in the infrastructure for 2027.”

Where is the maximum growth seen?

Well, it’s hardly a surprise to see that the highest growth rate is in the Randstad. Major stations like Rotterdam Centraal, Schiphol Airport, and Leiden Centraal are seeing a higher growth rate than the national average. It’s getting so busy that it’s getting harder to find a seat during rush hour, so you may have to be prepared to fight the crowd for a place to sit.

Do you use the Dutch railways often to commute for work or otherwise? Have you noticed this increase in crowds on the tracks? Let us know in the comments below!

Kavana Desai
Kavana Desaihttps://medium.com/@kavanadesai
Coping with the aftermath of her 3-year stint in the Netherlands, Kavana is a writer, content creator and editor for DutchReview. Hailing from India, she frequently blogs about the Netherlands, being Indian in the Netherlands, and everything in between. She envisions herself to one day be the youngest person to win that Nobel Prize for Literature (she is also not very humble but welcomes only constructive criticism). In the meantime, she fills her days with writing for DutchReview, writing her master's thesis on art theft, and writing fiction that will hopefully see the light of day soon.

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