Buzz off: mosquito wave due just as the Netherlands relaxes coronavirus rules

With the coming of summer comes a more unpleasant side-effect, namely mosquito season.

The first peak of mosquitos might come as early as next week, RTL Nieuws reports. That, we think, is just plain rude. The mosquitos are due to arrive just as the Netherlands relaxes coronavirus restrictions on cafes and terraces. Oh, you thought you could enjoy a beer in peace? Not if these buzzy boys have anything to do with it.

So, why now?

In order to develop and thrive, mosquitos need stagnant water. The reason they need the stagnant water is for them to place their eggs in it, so that they may hatch at a later time and come haunt you with their buzzing and blood-sucking attitude.

As it hasn’t rained that much this spring, the mosquitos have also been slow to rear their ugly heads.  However, yesterday’s rain provides a great breeding opportunity for these pesky insects.

Checking out the mosquito radar

The easiest way to track the situation of the mosquito season in the Netherlands is by checking out muggenradar.nl.

This website is a radar of mosquito activity throughout the country and you can also make your own reports of mosquito sightings to improve the accuracy of the radar. If you do struggle with them or are at-risk, it’s best to check it out.

Possibility of a longer mosquito season

Arnold van Vliet of Wageningen University says that we should expect a longer mosquito season due to the drought. According to him, when the temperature is higher, several generations of mosquitos can develop and thrive.

The trick to stopping them from growing is throwing out any still water around your house. For example, bowls that you left outside that have water in them are high-breeding grounds for mosquitos. You should also check out for stagnant water in other places, such as under wells.

How do you deal with these pesky insects? Let us know in the comments!

Feature Image: WikiImages/Pixabay 

Vlad Moca-Grama
Vlad was born and raised in Brasov, Romania and came to the Hague to study. When he isn't spending time missing mountains or complaining about the lack of urban exploration locations in the Netherlands, you can find him writing at Dutch Review.

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