Are there reliable and Free ways to learn Dutch? Yes, multiple ones!

11 months ago, I decided I was in love with The Netherlands and a lot of what it has to offer.  I decided to immerse myself as much as possible in Dutch culture. “So first things first,” I exclaimed, “I need to learn Dutch!“. So I thought, are there free ways to learn Dutch?

After having a couple of mini-heart attacks checking the price of group and private Dutch lessons, I sought cheaper (mostly free), and reliable alternatives to learn this tricky language.

11 months later, I can confidently say: Ja, Ik kan nederlands spreken.

Now, do I speak like a native. Nee, I certainly do not. Do I still sound like I’m sneezing and dying at the same time when I pronounce Scheveningen? Why yes, I do. Am I improving every day? Absolutely yes.

In other words, yes, there are free ways of actually learning Dutch. In this article, I’ll tell you a bit about some of the ways I learned Dutch for free. But in case you’re too lazy to read your way through, here’s a nice little video from us and Learn Dutch and Bart de Pau with whom we worked together to bring you this one (but seriously, read the rest, some good stuff there!) Bart de Pau provides free Dutch lessons on his website and also on his YouTube channel. So, if you’re struggling with those Dutch lesson fees (we know those prices can be pretty terrifying), you can practice your skills or learn straight from scratch – completely free! Bart de Pau’s videos are informative, lighthearted and easy to understand.

So with an exception of a small disclaimer in the next paragraph, here are the ‘5’ best ways of learning Dutch for free.

A note on the free ways to learn Dutch:

There a lot of levels involved in the process of learning Dutch, and even more levels on feeling completely comfortable speaking Dutch or any language that is not your native tongue. I’m not saying that if you use these alternatives you’ll be able to sing/know André Hazes’s ‘bloed zweet en tranen’ by heart. If you’re immigrating to the Netherlands and can afford lessons it is absolutely worth the effort. I’m saying that these practical exercises I used have allowed me to understand, read and speak Dutch in a way that:

  • I can engage in normal everyday Dutch conversations.
  • Read and understand most newspapers.
  • Listen to Dutch music, podcasts, radio shows, and follow what I hear.
  • Stop sayin ‘ik spreek geen nederlands’.
Ad

In all honesty, I don’t think there is one way that is better than the others. As a matter of fact, I would say that you should try to do all of them throughout different times in a week depending on your schedule and free time. But most importantly, be consistent on how often you commit to use each. Hopefully, they will help you as much as they have helped me.

Let’s start with #1:

Free ways to learn Dutch #1: Duolingo

Have you ever wondered how to say ‘my sandwich is under my rhinoceros!’ in Dutch? How about, ‘No! I am not a turtle.’ No? You’ve never wondered that? Weird… Well! It doesn’t matter, because if you use Duolingo you are going to get those and many other ridiculous (but useful) examples to work with.

I wonder who gets paid to come up with these examples.

Duolingo is a free language learning App for your phone/tablet/laptop, that allows you to choose and learn over 27 different languages (for English speakers). Some years ago, the Dutch language was added to this list, and I for one, am grateful.

As explained in the video above, Duolingo uses the power of translation and your brain, to make learning Dutch easy, and fun. The first basic rules regarding word order, how to make singular nouns into plurals, and the basic pronouns, I learned through Duolingo. 15 minutes a day, and I can almost guarantee you that you will have an initial, basic, and necessary understanding of the basic rules of Dutch. Whats more, Duolingo has a very active community of people that want to learn Dutch, who help you out whenever you post a question on their equally active forums. I would definitely recommend to start off with this App, and use it on a daily basis on the ‘serious’ commitment level.

Time to get serious on this Dutchy journey!

So grab your laptop/smartphone/tablet, put your trust in that green owl, and download Duolingo.

Free ways to learn Dutch #2: Children books and free or cheap libraries.

The second best way to learn Dutch for free is reading children books, and then progressively, moving towards more advanced books. Children books use very easy to understand sentences, and the plots of stories are very easy to follow if you have a basic understanding of Dutch.

free ways to learn dutch childrens book

If you’re progressively building your Dutch, grabbing a children’s book and reading it should not be a big challenge early on. Get yourself a new book once per week, and improve your Dutch reading skills!

“BUT RENÁN!! BOOKS COST MONEY AND YOU SAID THESE WERE FREE WAYS OF LEARNING DUTCH!!”

Listen, I know what I said. I said free ways to learn Dutch, and that’s what I’m providing. I want you to take a look at the picture down here:

bookshelf
‘What is this, a library for ants?’… Get it? From the movie ‘Zoolander’? No?… Goodness I’m old.

The last picture shows a ‘tiny library’. A tiny library is a small wooden house, that is most of the time on the wall of a house or building. You’ll find them all around The Hague and other cities in The Netherlands. Their main purpose in life, is to hold books for you.

They wait for you on a wall, so you can open their tiny doors, and take a book home. Then, after you’re done reading the book, you put it back in the same or different tiny library.

 

99% of the time these libraries have children books. They also have more advance books in Dutch that you can move on to when you’ve improved. It’s free, and you can leave behind a book of your own if you want to.

If, for some reason, you don’t have these sort of tiny libraries where you live, you can go to a Kringloop, which is a very popular second-hand store chain in The Netherlands, and get around 5 children books for 1 euro.

Free ways to learn Dutch #3: Your local library and self-learning books.

This might surprise you. But your local library lends self-learning books for the Dutch language absolutely free. I know, shocker.

It’s a pretty obvious thing to do, but few people do it. You go to your city library, go to the language section like the Taalhuis in The Hague’s central library, and get 1 of a thousand self-learning books on the Dutch language. During this 11 months, I’ve read 3 books on learning Dutch, and you have no idea how useful they were.

Grammatical rules, audio CDs and short stories, can all be found in these books and should definitely be part of your learning arsenal. Reading 1 of these free books every 2 month really builds up your learning experience with some always-useful formal and professional content that these sort of books have.

Free ways to learn Dutch #4: Netflix, podcasts, radio, etc.

Radio stations, podcasts and at least 1  free month of Netflix (if you don’t have an account already), all provide Dutch-language content for you to listen and watch.

Online, you have access to hundreds of free radio stations, shows with Dutch audio/subtitles and podcasts completely free of charge. Do some of your school work or cook your dinner while listening to news on the radio, or watch your favourite movie with English audio and Dutch subtitles.

Listening to a language spoken by a native (on the radio for example), is one of the best ways to learn the rhythm, sound and pronunciation of specific words. On the other hand, watching shows in English, with Dutch subtitles, is a great way of translating directly and immediately the Dutch translation of something being said.

netflix and chill
Netflix and chill? More like, Netflix and learning a foreign language.

Free ways to learn Dutch #5: Get a Dutch girlfriend/boyfriend, and surround yourself with Dutchies.

There’s a very common question that gets posted in some of the ‘Mexicans in Holland’ Facebook groups I’m part of. People frequently ask how to learn/practice Dutch. “You gotta get yourself a Dutch girlfriend/boyfriend amigo”, is what they say.

I would lie if I say that having a Dutch girlfriend has not made my Dutch learning experience a bit easier and much more enjoyable. It’s pretty obvious if you think about it. What better way of learning a language than having a native speaker constantly around you? Not only that, but you are also exposed to her/his friends/family who speak the language.

You also have (hopefully) frequent Dutch exchanges with your boyfriend/girlfriend, and you have someone to ask specific question on grammar, pronunciation etc. Wait, you don’t have a Dutch significant other? Then here is our video on how to get romantically involved with a Dutchie using some key Dutch phrases.

If dating is off your list of priorities at the moment, maybe making a good friend can also be an option.  The more the better! If it’s a party or Dutch borrel, you get the bonus of learning while you’re having fun.

During the first couple of borrels and ‘typical Dutch circle-sitting birthdays’, I was mainly looking around saying “ja” every 7 minutes. This, while my girlfriend and her friends were conversing away in what sounded like an alien language.

However, slowly but surely, I started to pick up one word, then 5 words, then 3 sentences, and then a whole exchange of words! And although it’s pretty common knowledge that Dutchies switch to English as soon as they hear your sad attempt at saying the word ‘onion’ in Dutch, you have to politely but affirmatively tell them: praat nederlands met mij (8).

Which brings me to the last free way to learn Dutch.

Free ways to learn Dutch #6: Persistence.

Listen, I’m not gonna tell you learning Dutch – or any other language for that matter – is easy. It’s hard. No, scratch that. It’s very hard. Even for someone like me who already speaks a bit of German, learning this language has not been a walk in the park. Besides considering the obvious difficulties of speaking/reading/listening in Dutch, you have to use time of your probably busy day to literally learn new words and rules you’ve never heard of.

angry face
Learning by heart which nouns are used with either ‘het’ or ‘de’ keeps me up at night.

But hey, nothing worth doing is easy. If there is one thing that is free is persistence. If you want to learn Dutch, then learn Dutch. Period. Try, and try again. Increase your Duolingo daily XP challenge, read 3 children books per month, get two girlfriends (joke!). 

The one thing expats always tell me when I get frustrated with this language (because I am still learning), is to keep trying. It’s true. If you want to learn this language you don’t need to depend exclusively on lessons or ‘the best money can buy’. The only thing you really need is a ‘can do attitude’, and the commitment to try a bit every day. Learning Dutch helps you with the more tricky things ilke how to navigate the housing market in the Netherlands.

And once again, for those serious about learning Dutch, by all means check out the Youtube channel by Bart de Pau: Learn Dutch. Next to tons of informational and good grammar stuff you’ll will also find some pretty funny vids about the Dutch language and learning Dutch. Like this shocker about DE or HET for instance:

 

What do you think of these free ways to learn Dutch? Do you know any other good, reliable and free ways to learn this language? If so, let us know in the comment section your own experience!

8 COMMENTS

  1. […] Finally, learning Dutch can really make life easier for a freelancer. Just think of paying your taxes, now imagine doing it in Dutch. Yeah, that’s right. Although learning Dutch is not completely necessary to become a freelancer and/or acquire clients, learning this language makes being a freelancer in The Netherlands easier in many levels. Check out one of our many Dutch learning articles to get you started!  […]

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.